Celebrate the Children
DATA COLLECTION PROTOCOL
Monica G. Osgood/CTC/2002


A notebook containing the following documents will be used to monitor each student's progress:

1. Program Check List
   A. Blank Check list
2. Schedule
3. Philosophy
4. Program Outline/DIR information
5. Assessments/Reports 
6. Notes to staff
7. IEP with individual goals
8. Sections for each category of the IEP containing:
   A. Goal sheet listing all IEP goals with areas to log monthly progress, dates started and dates mastered 
   B. Monthly program sheet listing goals and strategies for the month
   C. Daily data sheets to record progress of each goal
9. Language log

1. Program check list

This sheet is used to rate programs as they are targeted on a daily basis. This sheet is also an easy way to see what therapists have worked, when, and for how long. Anyone working with a child should sign in on the program check list entering their name, the date, and hours worked. Next, the therapist should observe which programs have been run most recently and target programs that haven't been done (unless otherwise instructed by the program manager). Some programs (in yellow highlighted areas) should be run daily. The check list should be rated at then end of each session, never during interactions!

The check list has columns to identify the Developmental Level, Program Number, and Program Component: F-Follow-Child's Lead; S-Semi-Structured; M-Sensory Motor. This will help you identify what developmental level the goals pertain to, what goals to target during the different components of your session, and the program number will help you reference the detailed program information on the monthly program sheet.

The program check list is very important and should be filled out every session.
It is crucial for the program manager and therapists to make sure all programs are being targeted.

 

The following rating scale is used to rate progress:
N-Not started
1-At baseline, skill introduced
2-In progress, needing full prompting
3-In progress, needing some prompting
4-In progress, needing minimal prompting
5-Demonstrating skill without prompting
M-Mastered-Demonstrating consistency in all setting

Social Example:

Skill: Child will begin to take on roles during play
N-Not started
Not yet working on this skill
1-At baseline, skill introduced
Introduced playing "Mommy" and "Daddy" while playing in the kitchen area. Child had no ability to take on a role.
2-In progress, needing full prompting
While playing the child needs constant reminding to stay in his/her role.
3-In progress, needing some prompting
While playing the child is able to stay in his/her role about 50% of the time without prompting.
4-In progress, needing minimal prompting
While playing the child is able to stay in his/her role about 80% of the time without prompting.
5-Demonstrating skill without prompting
While playing the child is able to stay in his/her role 90-100% of the time without prompting.
M-Mastered-Demonstrating consistency in all setting
The child has generalized the skill and is demonstrating it spontaneously in all settings. While playing in any setting the child can spontaneously take on, and maintain role play.

Academic Example:

Skill: Child will write his/her name on a line
N-Not started
Not yet working on this skill
1-At baseline, skill introduced
Introduced writing the child's name and they were unable to form the letters.
2-In progress, needing full prompting
Child is able to trace his/her name in boxes with hand-over-hand guidance.
3-In progress, needing some prompting
Child is able to trace his/her name in boxes/on a line without physical prompting.
4-In progress, needing minimal prompting
Child is able to write his/her name on a line with verbal or physical prompting.
5-Demonstrating skill without prompting
Child is able to write his/her name on a line without prompting.
M-Mastered-Demonstrating consistency in all setting
The child has generalized the skill and is demonstrating it spontaneously in all settings. Child is able to write his/her name on a line without prompting in all situations.

2. Schedule

Each individual child will follow the schedule that is developmentally appropriate for them as determined by the program manager. This schedule is purely a suggestion to help therapists and parents structure their time. It is strongly recommended that the child's goals take priority over the schedule. For example, if the child has goals related to engagement and intentionality, and the child is really intentional and connected during a specific activity, DO NOT stop the activity to stick to the schedule. It is OK to follow the child's lead to reach a goal.

2 HOUR THERAPY SESSION LEVEL 1

15 MINUTES
GROSS MOTOR/SENSORY INTEGRATION/SHARED TIMING ACTIVITY THAT FACILITATES GETTING CONNECTED

30 MINUTES
FOLLOW THE CHILD'S LEAD-DEEPEN THE CONNECTION ON A LESS PHYSICAL LEVEL (PLAY WITH TOYS, BOOKS, ETC.)

15 MINUTES
SEMI-STRUCTURED PLAY-TARGET SPECIFIC PROGRAMS THROUGH MOTIVATING ACTIVITIES

5 MINUTES
SENSORY INTEGRATION BREAK INDIVIDUALIZED TO THE CHILD'S NEEDS

10 MINUTES
FINE MOTOR WORK AT VERTICAL SURFACE OR TABLE or ORAL MOTOR PROGRAM

15 MINUTES
SEMI-STRUCTURED PLAY-TARGET SPECIFIC PROGRAMS THROUGH MOTIVATING ACTIVITIES

30 MINUTES
SENSORY MOTOR/MOTOR PLANNING ACTIVITIES

15 MINUTES
COMPLETE DATA

*INCLUDE PEERS IN ALL ASPECTS OF SESSION WHEN AVAILABLE.
HOWEVER, GAGE CHILD'S ANXIETY AND ABILITY TO TOLERATE SOCIAL INTERACTIONS. THEY MAY NEED BREAKS AWAY FROM THE PEER, ESPECIALLY IF PEER IS ACTIVE AND OVERSTIMULATING
*SENSORY BREAKS MAY BE INFUSED WITH INTERACTION GOALS IF THE INTERACTIONS DO NOT INTERFERE WITH THE BENEFITS OF THE SI SESIONOL/HOMEPROGRAMING/MGO4-99
2 HOUR THERAPY SESSION LEVEL 2A ACADEMIC

10 MINUTES
GROSS MOTOR/SPORTS/SI/ SHARED TIMING ACTIVITY THAT FACILITATES GETTING CONNECTED

15 MINUTES
FOLLOW THE CHILD'S LEAD-DEEPEN THE CONNECTION ON A LESS PHYSICAL LEVEL (DISCUSSIONS ABOUT CHILD'S INTERESTS, PLAY WITH TOYS, BOOKS, ETC. THAT ENCOURAGE ABSTRACT THOUGHT.)

15 MINUTES
SEMI-STRUCTURED PLAY-TARGET SPECIFIC PROGRAMS THROUGH MOTIVATING ACTIVITIES

5 MINUTES
SENSORY INTEGRATION BREAK INDIVIDUALIZED TO THE CHILD'S NEEDS

10 MINUTES
TARGET ACADEMICS THROUGH MOTIVATING ACTIVITIES
FINE MOTOR WORK AT VERTICAL SURFACE OR TABLE

5 MINUTES
SENSORY INTEGRATION BREAK INDIVIDUALIZED TO THE CHILD'S NEEDS
1 HOUR
10 MINUTES
TARGET ACADEMICS THROUGH MOTIVATING ACTIVITIES
FINE MOTOR WORK AT VERTICAL SURFACE OR TABLE

5 MINUTES
SENSORY INTEGRATION BREAK INDIVIDUALIZED TO THE CHILD'S NEEDS

15 MINUTES
SEMI-STRUCTURED PLAY-TARGET SPECIFIC PROGRAMS THROUGH MOTIVATING ACTIVITIES

15 MINUTES
SENSORY MOTOR/MOTOR PLANNING ACTIVITIES

15 MINUTES COMPLETE DATA

*INCLUDE PEERS IN ALL ASPECTS OF SESSION WHEN AVAILABLE.
HOWEVER, GAGE CHILD'S ANXIETY AND ABILITY TO TOLERATE SOCIAL INTERACTIONS. THEY MAY NEED BREAKS AWAY FROM THE PEER, ESPECIALLY IF PEER IS ACTIVE AND OVERSTIMULATING
*SENSORY BREAKS MAY BE INFUSED WITH INTERACTION GOALS IF THE INTERACTIONS DO NOT INTERFERE WITH THE BENEFITS OF THE SI

 

2 HOUR THERAPY SESSION LEVEL 2B NON-ACADEMIC

10 MINUTES
GROSS MOTOR/SPORTS/SI/SHARED TIMING ACTIVITY THAT FACILITATES GETTING CONNECTED

20 MINUTES
FOLLOW THE CHILD'S LEAD-DEEPEN THE CONNECTION ON A LESS PHYSICAL LEVEL (DISCUSSIONS ABOUT CHILD'S INTERESTS, PLAY WITH TOYS, BOOKS, ETC. THAT ENCOURAGE ABSTRACT THOUGHT.)

15 MINUTES
SEMI-STRUCTURED PLAY-TARGET SPECIFIC PROGRAMS THROUGH MOTIVATING ACTIVITIES

5 MINUTES
SENSORY INTEGRATION BREAK INDIVIDUALIZED TO THE CHILD'S NEEDS

15 MINUTES
SEMI-STRUCTURED PLAY-TARGET SPECIFIC PROGRAMS THROUGH MOTIVATING ACTIVITIES

25 MINUTES
SENSORY MOTOR/MOTOR PLANNING ACTIVITIES

15 MINUTES
FOLLOW THE CHILD'S LEAD-DEEPEN THE CONNECTION ON A LESS PHYSICAL LEVEL (DISCUSSIONS ABOUT CHILD'S INTERESTS, PLAY WITH TOYS, BOOKS, ETC. THAT ENCOURAGE ABSTRACT THOUGHT.)

15 MINUTES
COMPLETE DATA

*INCLUDE PEERS IN ALL ASPECTS OF SESSION WHEN AVAILABLE.
HOWEVER, GAGE CHILD'S ANXIETY AND ABILITY TO TOLERATE SOCIAL INTERACTIONS. THEY MAY NEED BREAKS AWAY FROM THE PEER, ESPECIALLY IF PEER IS ACTIVE AND OVERSTIMULATING

*SENSORY BREAKS MAY BE INFUSED WITH INTERACTION GOALS IF THE INTERACTIONS DO NOT INTERFERE WITH THE BENEFITS OF THE SI

3. Philosophy

This is a section to display the program philosophy so that therapists and new comers are reminded to use a consistent approach.

4. Program Outline/DIR information

This is where you may keep an outline of the program, schedules, and any relevant information. It is recommended to keep some basic DIR documents here such as the 6 developmental levels, the functional emotional capacities diagram, the principles of facilitating each developmental level (handouts by Serena from training manual.

5. Assessments/Reports

This is a place to keep any relevant information on the individual child. New information should be flagged by a highlighter post it to alert staff to review the document.

6. Notes to Staff

This is an area that the program manager can leave notes to the staff. Therapists should check this section before each session.

7. IEP with individual goals

The student's IEP is inserted into this section. Any relevant recommendations and/or evaluations may be put here for reference

8. Sections for each category of the IEP containing:
A. Goal sheet listing all IEP goals with areas to log monthly progress, dates started and dates mastered

This sheet lists all IEP goals for the year. Each month the program manager enters a monthly average (taken from the daily data sheets) for each goal. This clearly displays when a goal has been started, the monthly progress, and when the goal is mastered. Example goal sheet:

 

B. Monthly program sheet listing goals and strategies for the month

After reviewing the goal sheet, the program manager determines which goals to target and transfers them to the monthly program sheet. These are the goals that will be targeted that month. Following each goal are steps and strategies used to target the goal. Some goals will have detailed programs while others mere suggestions for implementation. This will reflect the type of goal. A specific academic or social skill is usually targeted using a detailed program. A goal such as "the child will be more flexible in group situations" may simply have suggested strategies to be used in group situations.

The program manager creates new program sheets for each section each month. However, if the need arises, other goals may be added to an existing sheet.

Example program sheet: 


C. Daily comment sheets to record progress of each goal
Each time a therapist works with a student on a particular program they must comment on, and rate the student's acquisition of the skill.
First, the therapist must log the date and their initials.
Second, the step section is a place to describe exactly what the therapist did. Some programs have multiple steps or areas to target. This is the place to define exactly what was targeted.
The comment section allows the therapist to briefly describe the student's performance and any suggestions or questions for the other therapists.
Finally, the therapist should give the student's performance a rating to be averaged at the end of the month.

Example comment/data sheet:

 

9. Language Log

This is simply a place to record any outstanding communication. This area does not have to be written in each session. However, any new communication developments should be recorded. Please include the date, staff name, context in which the child used the communication and describe the communication. Ex.:

Jan 12th, 2002 Monica

Today when we were playing with playdoh, Scott made a sound that was close to "Open." We had been working on "Open" all day. I'm not sure this was an approximation of the word to communicate to me. However, it is worth noting.